Posted by: Khepera | Sunday, 20 July 2008

“Net Native” music & the expanison of the Open Source paradigm


There is so much growth & change going on around us — instead of *out there* — that a lot of it just blows by most of us who don’t have our digital stethoscope(i.e. Reader) on the arteries of info surging the meshverse body technic/politic. Going to grab a reference on Creative Commons — a source every creative person should be familiar with — I ran across the post below. Now I had never heard of the term “net native”, much less heard it applied to music, but I know enough for it to make sense to me.

This is simply more handwriting on the wall that the centroid of commerce/business on this planet is shifting rapidly towards a web-based paradigm. Meshverse(in the BlogRoll) speaks to this often, in terms of ‘tipping points’ & the approaching singularity. What this means for the collective is that we are on the threshold of a moment analogous to the introduction of the Gutenberg press in Germany in 1439. To get a sense of the impact of this, consider that prior to that point, one had to have considerable money, and, perhaps more critically, the approval of church/monarch in order to print/reproduce, and thereby distribute one’s writings. Further, up until that point, reading was a ‘privilege’ reserved for the aforementioned group — monied & linked to the church/power structure. Reading rapidly became more important as information became more readily available.

Consider the parallel this presents to our present time where many creative people — writers, artists, musicians, photographers, etc. — are hamstrung in their efforts to get their work to the public because they must negotiate — & propitiate — the powers that be(publishers, producers, music companies) and accept the dictates of profit-splitting these powers impose. Amazon has being doing something similar with their Kindle device. The bottom line is one rubric continues to hold true: when faced with a single source for any good or service — read monopoly — that purveyor has the capacity to control the exchange/distribution process, and this most often manifests in ways which are to the detriment of both the creator and the consumer…essentially replicating the situation Gutenberg & the internet inherently undermine. He/she who controls the means of production &/or distribution gets to play god.

For this reason, we should all be paying much closer attention to Creative Commons, the Open Source(see also Opensource.org), and, now, this developing premise of “net native” content & media. Think of it this way: Wal-Mart came out & maximized their capacity to deliver in volume at low cost. CostCo and others over the years have done the same. Pressed by the economy and need for convenience, shoppers made these firms wealthy without consideration to the business practices these & others used to deliver the goods at those prices. If we pay attention to this “net native” developing wave, and other associated trends and vote with out wallets, instead of making the ‘powers that be’ wealthy, we can put $$$ directly into the hands of the creators of the books, music, art, etc. we crave so highly. It’s the same premise as the farmer’s markets springing up all around the cities. If you don’t want to pay high prices for music, books, etc., then help to usher in the age when you can go directly to the source and order/download precisely what you want. We — you — have the power, but like any force, it doesn’t matter much until you use it.

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Empowering economics of ‘net native’ music

Lucas Gonze:

Now consider that internet music businesses have to compete for investment capital with internet businesses that don’t pay royalties. Craigslist, Google search, and Twitter do nothing but move bits around!

Lastly, returning to the conversation about netlabels the other day, I want to point out that netlabel and other net-native music doesn’t have a lot of listeners, but as long as it stays clear of copyright infringement it can have economics just like Craiglist, Twitter etc. Maybe not at that scale, but definitely at that level of profitability.

And I know that people on the business side of internet music see net-native music as a joke. That’s right big shots, I’m talking to you specifically. Make free and legal music popular enough for your traffic to scale and you can have the grail — an internet music product that makes sense as a business. Which is exactly what Phlow-Magazine is working on by slicking up the presentation of those sources.

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Responses

  1. […] Article Valhalla wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerpt“Net Native” music & the expanison of the Open Source paradigm There is so much growth & change going on around us — instead of *out there* — that a lot of it just blows by most of us who don’t have our digital stethoscope(i.e. Reader) on the arteries of info surging the meshverse body technic/politic. Going to grab a reference on Creative Commons — a source every creative person should be familiar with — I ran across the post below. Now I had never heard of the term “net native”, mu […]


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